Objective

1. The objective of Accounting Standard (AS) 10 Property, Plant and Equipment is to prescribe the accounting treatment for property, plant and equipment so that users of the financial statements can discern information about investment made by an enterprise in its property, plant and equipment and the changes in such investment. The principal issues in accounting for property, plant and equipment are the recognition of the assets, the determination of their carrying amounts and the depreciation charges and impairment losses to be recognised in relation to them.

Scope

2. This Standard should be applied in accounting for property, plant and equipment except when another Accounting Standard requires or permits a different accounting treatment.

3. This Standard does not apply to:

(a) biological assets related to agricultural activity other than produce on bearer plants; and

(b) wasting assets including mineral rights, expenditure on the exploration for and extraction of minerals, oil, natural gas and similar non-regenerative resources. 

DEFINITIONS

Property, plant and equipment are tangible items that:

(a) are held for use in the production or supply of goods or services, for rental to others, or for administrative purposes; and

(b) are expected to be used during more than a period of twelve months. 

Recognition

7. The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment should be recognised as an asset if, and only if:

(a) it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the enterprise; and

(b) the cost of the item can be measured reliably. 

Measurement at Recognition

16. An item of property, plant and equipment that qualifies for recognition as an asset should be measured at its cost.

Elements of Cost

17. The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment comprises:

(a) its purchase price, including import duties and non –refundable purchase taxes,, after deducting trade discounts and rebates.

(b) any costs directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management.

(c)  the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling, removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located, referred to as ‘decommissioning, restoration and similar liabilities’, the obligation for which an enterprise incurs either when the item is acquired or as a consequence of having used the item during a particular period for purposes other than to produce inventories during that period.

23. The cost of a self-constructed asset is determined using the same principles as for an acquired asset. If an enterprise makes similar assets for sale in the normal course of business, the cost of the asset is usually the same as the cost of constructing an asset for sale (see AS 2). Therefore, any internal profits are eliminated in arriving at such costs. Similarly, the cost of abnormal amounts of wasted material, labour, or other resources incurred in self-constructing an asset is not included in the cost of the asset. AS 16, Borrowing Costs, establishes criteria for the recognition of interest as a component of the carrying amount of a self-constructed item of property, plant and equipment..

Measurement after Recognition

32. An enterprise should choose either the cost model in paragraph 33 or the revaluation model in paragraph 34 as its accounting policy and should apply that policy to an entire class of property, plant and equipment.

Cost Model

33. After recognition as an asset, an item of property, plant and equipment should be carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses.

Revaluation Model

34. After recognition as an asset, an item of property, plant and equipment whose fair value can be measured reliably should be carried at a revalued amount, being its fair value at the date of the revaluation less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and subsequent accumulated impairment losses. Revaluations should be made with sufficient regularity to ensure that the carrying amount does not differ materially from that which would be determined using fair value at the balance sheet date.

42. An increase in the carrying amount of an asset arising on revaluation should be credited directly to owners’ interests under the heading of revaluation surplus However, the increase should be recognised in the statement of profit and loss to the extent that it reverses a revaluation decrease of the same asset previously recognised in the statement of profit and loss.

43. A decrease in the carrying amount of an asset arising on revaluation should be charged to the statement of profit and loss. However, the decrease should be debited directly to owners’ interests under the heading of revaluation surplus to the extent of any credit balance existing in the revaluation surplus in respect of that asset.

Depreciation

45. Each part of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item should be depreciated separately.

50. The depreciation charge for each period should be recognised in the statement of profit and loss unless it is included in the carrying amount of another asset.

Depreciable Amount and Depreciation Period

52. The depreciable amount of an asset should be allocated on a systematic basis over its useful life.

53. The residual value and the useful life of an asset should be reviewed at least at each financial year-end and, if expectations differ from previous estimates, the change(s) should be accounted for as a change in an accounting estimate in accordance with AS 5, Net Profit or Loss for the Period, Prior Period Items and Changes in Accounting Policies.

Depreciation Method

62. The depreciation method used should reflect the pattern in which the future economic benefits of the asset are expected to be consumed by the enterprise.

63. The depreciation method applied to an asset should be reviewed at least at each financial year-end and, if there has been a significant change in the expected pattern of consumption of the future economic benefits embodied in the asset, the method should be changed to reflect the changed pattern. Such a change should be accounted for as a change in an accounting estimate in accordance with AS 5.

Derecognition

74. The carrying amount of an item of property, plant and equipment should be derecognised

(a) on disposal; or

(b) when no future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

75. The gain or loss arising from the derecognition of an item of property, plant and equipment should be included in the statement of profit and loss when the item is derecognised (unless AS 19, Leases, requires otherwise on a sale and leaseback). Gains should not be classified as revenue, as defined in AS 9, Revenue Recognition.

76. However, an enterprise that in the course of its ordinary activities, routinely sells items of property, plant and equipment that it had held for rental to others should transfer such assets to inventories at their carrying amount when they cease to be rented and become held for sale. The proceeds from the sale of such assets should be recognised in revenue in accordance with AS 9, Revenue Recognition..

79. The gain or loss arising from the derecognition of an item of property, plant and equipment should be determined as the difference between the net disposal proceeds, if any, and the carrying amount of the item.

Disclosure

81. The financial statements should disclose, for each class of property, plant and equipment:

(a) the measurement bases (i.e., cost model or revaluation model) used for determining the gross carrying amount;

(b) the depreciation methods used;

(c) the useful lives or the depreciation rates used. In case the useful lives or the depreciation rates used are different from those specified in the statute governing the enterprise, it should make a specific mention of that fact;

(d) the gross carrying amount and the accumulated depreciation (aggregated with accumulated impairment losses) at the beginning and end of the period; and

(e) a reconciliation of the carrying amount at the beginning and end of the period showing:

(i) additions;

(ii) assets retired from active use and held for disposal;

(iii) acquisitions through business combinations ;

(iv) increases or decreases resulting from revaluations under paragraphs 34, 42 and 43 and from impairment losses recognised or reversed directly in revaluation surplus in accordance with AS 28;

(v) impairment losses recognised in the statement of profit and loss in accordance with AS 28;

(vi) impairment losses reversed in the statement of profit and loss in accordance with AS 28;

(vii) depreciation;

(viii) the net exchange differences arising on the translation of the financial statements of a non-integral foreign operation in accordance with AS 11, The Effects of Changes in Foreign Exchange Rates; and

(ix) other changes.

PREPARED BY: – KRIT GARG, PARSHOTAM AND ASSOCIATES

Author Bio

Name: Krit garg
Qualification: Student - CA/CS/CMA
Company: N/A
Location: ludhiana, Punjab, IN
Member Since: 28 Dec 2017 | Total Posts: 1

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