Case Law Details

Case Name : Rotork Controls India (P) Ltd. Vs CIT (Supreme Court of India)
Appeal Number : Civil Appeal Nos. 3506-3510 of 2009
Date of Judgement/Order : 12/05/2009
Related Assessment Year :
Courts : Supreme Court of India (875)

RELEVANT PARAGRAPH

10. What is a provision? This is the question which needs to be answered. A provision is a liability which can be measured only by using a substantial degree of estimation. A provision is recognized when: (a) an enterprise has a present obligation as a result of a past event; (b) it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation; and (c) a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. If these conditions are not met, no provision can be recognized.

11. Liability is defined as a present obligation arising from past events, the settlement of which is expected to result in an outflow from the enterprise of resources embodying economic benefits.

12. A past event that leads to a present obligation is called as an obligating event. The obligating event is an event that creates an obligation which results in an outflow of resources. It is only those obligations arising from past events existing independently of the future conduct of the business of the enterprise that is recognized as provision. For a liability to qualify for recognition there must be not only present obligation but also the probability of an outflow of resources to settle that obligation. Where there are a number of obligations (e.g. product warranties or similar contracts) the probability that an outflow will be required in settlement, is determined by considering the said obligations as a whole. In this connection, it may be noted that in the case of a manufacture and sale of one single item the provision for warranty could constitute a contingent liability not entitled to deduction under Section 37 of the said Act. However, when there is manufacture and sale of an army of items running into thousands of units of sophisticated goods, the past event of defects being detected in some of such items leads to a present obligation which results in an enterprise having no alternative to settling that obligation. In the present case, the appellant has been manufacturing and selling Valve Actuators. They are in the business from assessment years 1983- 84 onwards. Valve Actuators are sophisticated goods. Over the years appellant has been manufacturing Valve Actuators in large numbers. The statistical data indicates that every year some of these manufactured Actuators are found to be defective. The statistical data over the years also indicates that being sophisticated item no customer is prepared to buy Valve Actuator

without a warranty. Therefore, warranty became integral part of the sale price of the Valve Actuator(s). In other words, warranty stood attached to the sale price of the product. These aspects are important. As stated above, obligations arising from past events have to be recognized as provisions. These past events are known as obligating events. In the present case, therefore, warranty provision needs to be recognized because the appellant is an enterprise having a present obligation as a result of past events

resulting in an outflow of resources. Lastly, a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. In short, all three conditions for recognition of a provision are satisfied in this case.

13. In this case we are concerned with Product Warranties. To give an example of Product Warranties, a company dealing in computers gives warranty for a period of 36 months from the date of supply. The said company considers following options : (a) account for warranty expense in the year in which it is incurred; (b) it makes a provision for warranty only when the customer makes a claim; and (c) it provides for warranty at 2% of turnover of the company based on past experience (historical trend). The first option is unsustainable since it would tantamount to accounting for warranty expenses on cash basis, which is prohibited both under the Companies Act as well as by the Accounting Standards which require accrual concept to be followed. In the present case, the Department is insisting on the first option which, as stated above, is erroneous as it rules out the accrual concept. The second option is also inappropriate since it does not reflect the expected warranty costs in respect of revenue already recognized (accrued). In other words, it is not based on matching concept. Under the matching concept, if revenue is recognized the cost incurred to earn that revenue including warranty costs has to be fully provided for. When Valve Actuators are sold and the warranty costs are an integral part of that sale price then the appellant has to provide for such warranty costs in its account for the relevant year, otherwise the matching concept fails. In such a case the second option is also inappropriate. Under the circumstances, the third option is most appropriate because it fulfills accrual concept as well as the matching concept. For determining an appropriate historical trend, it is important that the company has a proper accounting system for capturing relationship between the nature of the sales, the warranty provisions made and the actual expenses incurred against it subsequently. Thus, the decision on the warranty provision should be based on past experience of the company. A detailed assessment of the warranty provisioning policy is required particularly if the experience suggests that warranty provisions are generally reversed if they remained unutilized at the end of the period prescribed in the warranty. Therefore, the company should scrutinize the historical trend of warranty provisions made and the actual expenses incurred against it. On this basis a sensible estimate should be made. The warranty provision for the products should be based on the estimate at year end of future warranty expenses. Such estimates need reassessment every year. As one reaches close to the end of the warranty period, the probability that the warranty expenses will be incurred is considerably reduced and that should be reflected in the estimation amount. Whether this should be done through a pro rata reversal or otherwise would require assessment of historical trend. If warranty provisions are based on experience and historical trend(s) and if the working is robust then the question of reversal in the subsequent two years, in the above example, may not arise in a significant way. In our view, on the facts and circumstances of this case, provision for warranty is rightly made by the appellant-enterpris e because it has incurred a present obligation as a result of past events. There is also an outflow of resources. A reliable estimate of the obligation was also possible. Therefore, the appellant has incurred a liability, on the facts and circumstances of this case, during the relevant assessment year which was entitled to deduction under Section 37 of the 1961 Act. Therefore, all the three conditions for recognizing a liability for the purposes of provisioning stands satisfied in this case. It is important to note that there are four important aspects of provisioning. They are – provisioning which relates to present obligation, it arises out of obligating events, it involves outflow of resources and lastly it involves reliable estimation of obligation. Keeping in mind all the four aspects, we are of the view that the High Court should not to have interfered with the decision of the Tribunal in this case.

14. In this case the High Court has principally gone by the judgment of the Supreme Court in the case of Shree Sajjan Mills (supra). That was the case of gratuity. For the assessment year 1974-75 the assessee-company sought to deduct a sum of Rs.18,37,727/ – towards the amount of gratuity payable to its employees and worked out actuarially. No provision was made for Rs.18,37,727/ -. The claim for deduction was made on the ground that the liability stood ascertained by actuarial valuation and, therefore, was deductible under Section 37 of the 1961 Act. The ITO allowed the deduction only in respect of the amounts actually paid by the assessee and the rest was disallowed on the ground of non-compliance with the provisions of Section 40A(7) of the 1961 Act. This view of the ITO was affirmed by CIT(A). The Tribunal held that for the earlier assessment year relating to 1973-74, actuarially ascertained liability for gratuity arising under Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972 was an allowable deduction. However, for the assessment year in question, the Tribunal held that the increased liability claimed by the assessee for deduction was allowable on general principles of accounting. This view was taken by the Tribunal on the basis that the actuarially determined liability was not provided for in the assessee’s books of account. In appeal by the Department, the High Court held that the assessee was not entitled to deduction without complying with the provisions of Section 40A(7) of the 1961 Act. This view of the High Court was affirmed by this Court. It was held that Section 40A(7) which stood inserted by Finance Act, 1975 w.e.f. 1.4.73 has been given an overriding effect over Section 28 as well as Section 37 of the 1961 Act. Consequently, the deduction allowable on general principles was ruled out as Section 40A(1) made it clear that Section 40A had effect notwithstanding anything contained in Sections 30 to 39 of the 1961 Act. In other words, as regards deduction in respect of gratuity, the assessee was required to comply with the provisions of Section 40A(7) after Finance Act, 1975. It is interesting to note that prior to 1.4.73 actual payment or provision for payment was eligible for deduction either under Section 28 or under Section 37 of the 1961 Act. This has been reiterated in Shree Sajjan Mills (supra). The position got altered only after 1.4.73 Before that date, provision made in the P & L Account for the estimated present value of the contingent liability properly ascertained and discounted on an accrued basis could be deducted either under Section 28 or Section 37 of the 1961 Act. This has been explained in Shree Sajjan Mills (supra) at page 599. Section 40A(7) deals only with the case of gratuity. Even in the case of gratuity but for insertion of Section 40A(7), provision made in the P & L Account on the basis of present value of the contingent liability properly ascertained and discounted on an accrued basis was entitled to deduction either under Section 28 or under Section 37 of the said Act. This aspect, therefore, indicates that the present value of the contingent liability like the warranty expense, if properly ascertained and discounted on accrued basis, could be an item of deduction under Section 37 of the said Act. This aspect is not noticed in the impugned judgment. We may add a caveat. As stated above, the principle of estimation of the contingent liability is not the normal rule. As stated above, it would depend on the nature of business, the nature of sales, the nature of the product manufactured and sold and the scientific method of accounting being adopted by the assessee. It will also depend upon the historical trend. It would also depend upon the number of articles produced. As stated above, if it is a case of single item being produced then the principle of estimation of contingent liability on pro rata basis may not apply. However, in the present case, it is not so. In the present case, we have the situation of large number of items being produced. They are sophisticated goods. They are supported by the historical trend, namely, defects being detected in some of the items. The data also indicates that the warranty cost(s) is embedded in the sale price. The data also indicates that the warranty is attached to the sale price. In the circumstances, we hold that the principle laid down by this Court in the case of Metal Box Company of India (supra) will apply. In that case this Court held that contingent liabilities discounted and valued as out-of- necessity could be taken into account as trading expenses if these were capable of being valued. It was further held that an estimated liability even under a gratuity scheme even if it was a contingent liability if properly ascertainable and if its present value stood fairly discounted, was deductible from the gross profits while preparing the P & L Account. In view of this decision it became permissible for an assessee to provide, in his P & L Account, for the estimated liability under a gratuity scheme by ascertaining its present value on accrued basis and claiming it as an ascertained liability to be deducted in the computation of profit and gains of the previous year either under Section 28 or under Section 37 of the 1961 Act. However, the above principle would not apply after insertion of Section 40A(7) w.e.f. 1.4.73. It may be stated that the principles of commercial accounting, mentioned above, formed the basis of the judgment of this Court in the case of Metal Box Company of India (supra) and those principles are affirmed by the judgment of the Supreme Court in Shree Sajjan Mills (supra) upto 1.4.73. In this case we are concerned with warranty claims. In respect of warranty claims during the relevant assessment years in question there is no provision similar to Section 40A(7) of the 1961 Act. We may add that the above principle of commercial accounting in Metal Box Company of India (supra) also find place in the judgment of this Court in the case of Madras Industrial Investment Corporation Ltd. v Commissioner of Income Tax, 225 ITR 802 (SC), in which the Court has explained the meaning of the word “expenditure” in Section 37 of the 1961 Act. In other words, the principle enunciated in Metal Box Company of India (supra) which has been reiterated in Shree Sajjan Mills (supra) (upto 1.4.73) which deals with making of provision on the basis of estimated present value of contingent liability holds good during the assessment years in question qua warranty claims.

17. At this stage, we once again reiterate that a liability is a present obligation arising from past events, the settlement of which is expected to result in an outflow of resources and in respect of which a reliable estimate is possible of the amount of obligation. As stated above, the case of Indian Molasses Co. (supra) is different from the present case. As stated above, in the present case we are concerned with an army of items of sophisticated (specialiased) goods manufactured and sold by the assessee whereas the case of Indian Molasses Co. (supra) was restricted to an individual retiree. On the other hand, the case of Metal Box Company of India (supra) pertained to an army of employees who were due to retire in future. In that case the company had estimated its liability under two gratuity schemes and the amount of liability was deducted from the gross receipts in the profit and loss account. The company had worked out its estimated liability on actuarial valuation. It had made provision for such liability spread over to a number of years. In such a case it was held by this Court that the provision made by the assessee-company for meeting the liability incurred by it under the gratuity scheme would be entitled to deduction out of the gross receipts for the accounting year during which the provision is made for the liability. The same principle is laid down in the judgment of this Court in the case of Bharat Earth Movers v. CIT [2000] 245 ITR 428. In that case the assessee company had formulated leave encashment scheme. It was held, following the judgment in Metal Box Company of India (supra), that the provision made by the assessee for meeting the liability incurred under leave encashment scheme proportionate with the entitlement earned by the employees, was entitled to deduction out of gross receipts for the accounting year during which the provision is made for that liability. The principle which emerges from these decisions is that if the historical trend indicates that large number of sophisticated goods were being manufactured in the past and in the past if the facts established show that defects existed in some of the items manufactured and sold then the provision made for warranty in respect of the army of such sophisticated goods would be entitled to deduction from the gross receipts under Section 37 of the 1961 Act. It would all depend on the data systematically maintained by the assessee. It may be noted that in all the impugned judgments before us the assessee(s) has succeeded except in the case of Civil Appeal Nos. of 2009 – Arising out of S.L.P.(C) Nos.14178-14182 of 2007 – M/s. Rotork Controls India (P) Ltd. v. Commissioner of Income Tax, Chennai, in which the Madras High Court has overruled the decision of the Tribunal allowing deduction under Section 37 of the 1961 Act. However, the High Court has failed to notice the “reversal” which constituted part of the data systematically maintained by the assessee over last decade.

More Under Income Tax

Posted Under

Category : Income Tax (24907)
Type : Judiciary (9822)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *