Case Law Details

Case Name : Shri Narayan Tatu Rane Vs ITO (ITAT Mumbai)
Appeal Number : I.T.A. No. 2690/Mum/2016
Date of Judgement/Order : 06/05/2016
Related Assessment Year : 2007-08, 2008-09
Courts : All ITAT (1730) ITAT Mumbai (489)

In the case of Former Chief Minister of Maharashtra Narayan Rane ITAT Mumbbai held that before holding an order to be erroneous, Ld Pr. CIT should have conducted necessary enquiries or verification in order to show that the finding given by the assessing officer is erroneous, the Ld Pr. CIT should have shown that the view taken by the AO is unsustainable in law.

It further held that there is doubt whether Explanation 2(a) to sec. 263, inserted by Finance Act 2015 w.e.f. 01.04.2015 has retrospective effect.

In the instant case, the assessing officer has reopened the assessment only to assess the income, if any, that has escaped the assessment for the years under consideration. The assessments have been reopened only on the basis of the impugned incriminating document found at the premises of M/s RNS infrastructure. We also notice that the search team has recorded a statement from VP – Finance of M/s RNS Infrastructure Ltd u/s 132(4) of the Act on 12.2012 and he was confronted with the impugned incriminating document. In the reply given by the VP – Finance, he has stated that the entries were made by him on the basis of information given to him over phone from its Kudal Maharashtra branch. With regard to the entry made as “Rane-CM” also, he simply stated that the information was received from the branch. Thus, we notice that in none of the answers given, the VP- finance has implicated the assessee. In spite of these facts, the investigation wing has passed on these documents and information to the assessing officer and accordingly he has also reopened the assessments of the two years under consideration.

The assessing officer has also furnished to the assessee the reasons for reopening of the assessments and the assessee has also objected to the The assessing officer has specifically addressed those objections and has also rejected the same. In the notice issued u/s 142(1) of the Act, the assessing officer has asked the assessee to clarify about the impugned incriminating document and also to give explanations as to why the amounts mentioned therein should not be added back to the total income of the assessee. In response thereto, the assessee has filed a reply, wherein he has denied any connection with the incriminating document. The assessing officer was satisfied with the said explanations and accordingly did not make any addition to the total income in both the years.

However, the Ld Pr. CIT has taken the view that the assessing officer has completed the assessments without making proper enquiries with regard to the incriminating documents. According to Ld Pr. CIT, the AO should have made further enquiries in this matter. Accordingly he has passed the impugned revision order.

We have noticed earlier that the Ld Pr. CIT can revised the order only if it is shown that the assessment order is erroneous in so far as prejudicial to the interests of the revenue. The question as to when an order can be termed as “erroneous” was explained by Hon’ble Bombay High Court in the case of Gabriel India Ltd (supra) as under:-

“From the aforesaid definitions it is clear that an order cannot be termed as erroneous unless it is not in accordance with law. If an income tax officer acting in accordance with the law makes a certain assessment, the same cannot be branded as erroneous by the Commissioner simply because, according to him, the order should have been written more elaborately. This section does not visualise a case of substitution of the judgment of the Commissioner for that of the Income-tax Officer, who passed the order, unless the decision is held to be erroneous. Cases may be visualised where the Income tax officer while making an assessment examines the accounts, makes enquiries, applies his mind to the facts and circumstances of the case and determines the income either by accepting the accounts or by making some estimate himself. The Commissioner, on perusal of records, may be of the opinion that the estimate made by the officer concerned was on the lower side and left to the Commissioner he would have estimated the income at a figure higher than the one determined by the Income tax officer. That would not vest the Commissioner with power to examine the accounts and determine the income himself at a higher figure. It is because the Income tax officer has exercised the quasi judicial power vested in him in accordance with law and arrived at a conclusion and such a conclusion cannot be termed to be erroneous simply because the Commissioner does not feel satisfied with the conclusion…. There must be some prima facie material on record to show that the tax which was lawfully exigible has not been imposed or that by the application of the relevant statute on an incorrect or incomplete interpretation a lesser tax than what was just has been impsed”

The Hon’ble High Court has considered the definitions given to the words “erroneous”, “erroneous assessment” and “erroneous judgment” in Black’s Law Dictionary and and accordingly held that an order cannot be termed as erroneous unless it is not in accordance with law. An order can be termed as “erroneous” only if it is not in accordance with the law.

The Hon’ble Delhi High Court has also followed the above said view in the case of CIT Vs. Sunbeam Auto Ltd (2011)(332 ITR 167). The Hon’ble Delhi High Court has also extracted following observations made by the Tribunal:-

“38. Still further, the Hon’ble Supreme Court in Malabar Industrial Co. (2000) 243 ITR 83 has held that when two views are possible and the Assessing Officer has taken one of the possible view, then the order cannot be held to be prejudicial to the interest of the Revenue. Since the Commissioner of Income tax could not come to a definite finding that the expenditure in question was a capital expenditure in the proceedings under section 263, in our opinion, the order of the assessing officer could not be held to be erroneous.”

In the case of Nagesh Knitwears P Ltd (2012)(345 ITR 135), the Hon’ble Delhi High Court has elucidated and explained the scope of the provisions of sec. 263 of the Act and the same has been extracted by the Delhi High court in the case of CIT Vs. Goetze (India) Ltd (361 ITR 505) as under:-

“Thus, in cases of wrong opinion or finding on merits, the Commissioner of Income tax has to come to the conclusion and himself decide that the order is erroneous, by conducting necessary enquiry, if required and necessary, before the order under section 263 is passed. In such cases, the order of the Assessing Officer will be erroneous because the order is not sustainable in law and the said finding must be recorded. The Commissioner of Income tax cannot remand the matter to the Assessing Officer to decide whether the findings recorded are erroneous. In cases where there is inadequate enquiry but not lack of enquiry, again the Commissioner of Income tax must give and record a finding that the order/inquiry made is erroneous. This can happen if an enquiry and verification is conducted by the Commissioner of Income tax and he is able to establish and show the error or mistake made by the Assessing officer, making the order unstainable in law. In some cases possibly though rarely, the Commissioner of Income tax can also show and establish that the facts on record or inferences drawn from facts on record per se justified and mandated further enquiry or investigation but the Assessing officer had erroneously not undertaken the same. However, the said finding must be clear, unambiguous and not debatable. The matter cannot be remitted for a fresh decision to the Assessing Officer to conduct further enquiries without a finding that the order is erroneous. Finding that the order is erroneous is a condition or requirement which must be satisfied for exercise of jurisdiction under section 263 of the Act. In such matters, to remand the matter/ssie to the Assessing Officer would imply and mean the Commissioner of Income tax has not examined and decided whether or not the order is erroneous but has directed the Assessing Officer to decide the aspect/question….”

Similar view has been expressed by Hon’ble Madras High Court in the case of CIT Vs. Amalgamations Ltd (238 ITR 963).

The law interpreted by the High Courts makes it clear that the Ld Pr. CIT, before holding an order to be erroneous, should have conducted necessary enquiries or verification in order to show that the finding given by the assessing officer is erroneous, the Ld Pr. CIT should have shown that the view taken by the AO is unsustainable in law.

In the instant case, the Ld Pr. CIT has failed to do so and has simply expressed the view that the assessing officer should have conducted enquiry in a particular manner as desired by him. Such a course of action of the Ld Pr. CIT is not in accordance with the mandate of the provisions of sec. 263 of the Act.

The Ld Pr. CIT has taken support of the newly inserted Explanation 2(a) to sec. 263 of the Act. Even though there is a doubt as to whether the said explanation, which was inserted by Finance Act 2015 w.e.f. 1.4.2015, would be applicable to the year under consideration, yet we are of the view that the said Explanation cannot be said to have over ridden the law interpreted by Hon’ble Delhi High Court, referred above. If that be the case, then the Ld Pr. CIT can find fault with each and every assessment order, without conducting any enquiry or verification in order to establish that the assessment order is not sustainable in law and order for revision. He can also force the AO to conduct the enquiries in the manner preferred by Ld Pr. CIT, thus prejudicing the independent application of mind of the AO. Definitely, that could not be the intention of the legislature in inserting Explanation 2 to sec. 263 of the Act, since it would lead to unending litigations and there would not be any point of finality in the legal proceedings. The Hon’ble Supreme Court has held in the case of Parashuram Pottery Works Co. Ltd Vs. ITO (1977)(106 ITR 1) that there must be a point of finality in all legal proceedings and the stale issues should not be reactivitated beyond a particular stage and the lapse of time must induce repose in and set at rest judicial and quasi-judicial controversies as it must in other spheres of human activity.

Further clause (a) of Explanation states that an order shall be deemed to be erroneous, if it has been passed without making enquiries or verification, which should have been made. In our considered view, this provison shall apply, if the order has been passed without making enquiries or verification which a reasonable and prudent officer shall have carried out in such cases, which means that the opinion formed by Ld Pr. CIT cannot be taken as final one, without scrutinising the nature of enquiry or verification carried out by the AO vis-à-vis its reasonableness in the facts and circumstances of the case. Hence, in our considered view, what is relevant for clause (a) of Explanation 2 to sec. 263 is whether the AO has passed the order after carrying our enquiries or verification, which a reasonable and prudent officer would have carried out or It does not authorise or give unfettered powers to the Ld Pr. CIT to revise each and every order, if in his opinion, the same has been passed without making enquiries or verification which should have been made. In our view, it is the responsibility of the Ld Pr. CIT to show that the enquiries or verification conducted by the AO was not in accordance with the enquries or verification that would have been carried out by a prudent officer. Hence, in our view, the question as to whether the amendment brought in by way of Explanation 2(a) shall have retrospective or prospective application shall not be relevant.

In the instant case, as noticed earlier, the AO has accepted the explanations of the assessee, since there is no fool proof evidence to link the assessee with the document and M/s RNS Infrastructure Ltd, from whose hands it was seized, also did not implicate the assessee. Thus, the assessee has been expected to prove a negative fact, which is humanely not possible. No other corroborative material was available with the department to show that the explanations given by the assessee were wrong or incorrect. Under these set of facts, the AO appears to have been satisfied with the explanations given by the assessee and did not make any addition. We have noticed that the Hon’ble Supreme Court has held in the case of Central Bureau of Investigation Vs. V.C. Shukla and Others (supra) that the entries in the books of account by themselves are not sufficient to charge any person with liability. Hence, in our view, it cannot be held that the assessing officer did not carry out enquiry or verification which should have been done, since the facts and circumstances of the case and the incriminating document was not considered to be strong by the AO to implicate the assessee. Thus, we are of the view that the assessing officer has taken a plausible view in the facts and circumstances of the case. Even though the Ld Pr. CIT has drawn certain adverse inferences from the document, yet it can seen that they are debatable in nature. Further, as noticed earlier, the Ld Pr. CIT has not brought any material on record by making enquiries or verifications to substantiate his inferences. He has also not shown that the view taken by him is not sustainable in law. Thus, we are of the view that the Ld Pr. CIT has passed the impugned revision orders only to carry out fishing and roving enquiries with the objective of substituting his views with that of the AO. Hence we are of the view that the Ld Pr. CIT was not justified was not correct in law in holding that the impugned assessment orders were erroneous.

We have also seen that, in order to invoke the provisions of revisional proceedings, it is required to be shown that the assessment order was not only erroneous, but also prejudicial to the interests of the revenue. At the time of hearing, it was pointed out to Ld D.R that there are references to various names such as Mumbai Naveen, Ravi Mumbai, Vijaya Mum, Sanjeev Shetty etc. Further the entries are dated from March 99 to February, 2012. Under these set of facts, a specific question was asked to Ld D.R as to how these entries can transalate into income in the hands of the assessee, since the same lists out payments made to various persons on various dates. Unless it is established that these payments can be taken as income in the hands of the assessee, they cannot be assessed in his hands. In that case, it cannot be said that these entries would cause any prejudice to the interests of the revenue, if they are not assessable in the hands of the assessee. The Ld D.R replied that these aspects require examination at the end of the assessing officer. The said stand taken by the department clearly shows that they are also not sure as to whether these entries could be considered as income in the hands of the assessee. Further, we notice that the Ld Pr. CIT has not brought on record any material to show that these amounts were paid to the assessee or on his behalf. Even if it is considered for a moment that the assessee could be linked with it, without showing that the entries noted down in the impugned document results in income in the hands of the assessee, in our considered view, it cannot be said that the assessment orders passed by the AO could be taken as prejudicial to the interests of the revenue. Accordingly we are of the view that the revision orders passed by Ld Pr. CIT falls on this ground also.

In view of the foregoing discussions, we are of the view that the Ld Pr. CIT has failed to show that the impugned assessment orders passed by the assessing officer were not only erroneous but also prejudicial to the interests of the revenue. It is a well established proposition that both the above said conditions are required to be satisfied before invoking the revisional powers given u/s 263 of the Act. In the instant case, we are of the view that the Ld Pr. CIT has failed to show that both the conditions exist in the instant case. Accordingly we find merit in the contentions of the assessee that the revision orders passed by Ld Pr. CIT for the years under consideration are beyond the scope of sec. 263 and hence not valid. Accordingly we set aside the revision orders passed by Ld CIT for the two years under consideration.

Download Judgment/Order

More Under Income Tax

Posted Under

Category : Income Tax (20867)
Type : Judiciary (8912)
Tags : ITAT Judgments (3704) section 263 (86)

Search Posts by Date